How people are healing from chronic illness: treating Lyme with plant-made chemicals

Anna Goc and her team research phytochemicals (chemicals that plants make) at the Dr. Rath Research Institute. Through animal testing and cell culture testing, they whittled down various compounds to these 6:

  • polyphenolic compounds (baicalein, luteolin, and rosmarinic acid)
  • fatty acids (monolaurin and cis-2-decenoic acid)
  • iodine/kelp

Then they tested in human volunteers. This is important because a lot of things that work on cell cultures and lab animals don’t actually work in humans. Many of the humans got better, though not all of them improved.

A small observational study revealed that after administration of this composition to 17 volunteers three times per day for 6 months, 67.4% of the volunteers with late or persistent LD, and not receptive to previous antibiotic application, responded positively, in terms of energy status as well as physical and psychological wellbeing to supplementation with this composition, while 17.7% had slight improvement, and 17.7% were none responsive.

Their results are published in the paper Specific composition of polyphenolic compounds with fatty acids as an approach in helping to reduce spirochete burden in Lyme disease: in vivo and human observational study

If you’re a fan of things that plants make, this may be worth looking into.

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  • Oregano, Cinnamon, and Clove Oils. Dr. Zhang has shown these oils are effective at treating growing and perister states of Lyme and Bartonella.
  • Cryptolepis. This herbal medicine is traditionally used to treat Babesia and Malaria. But in two different studies this last year, Dr Zhang and his colleagues have shown it is effective at treating growing and persister forms of Bartonella and Lyme.
  • Japanese Knotweed. This herbal medicine is traditionally used to treat Lyme and Bartonella as described in the various books by master herbalist Stephen Buhner. Dr. Zhang and his colleagues have shown that it treats growing and persister states of Lyme and Bartonella.
  • Cat’s Claw. This herbal medicine is traditionally used to treat Lyme and is recommended to treat this by Stephen Buhner. Dr. Zhang and his colleagues have shown that it treats persister, but not growing states, of Lyme.

The various research articles will be footnoted on this page